China and the Asia-Pacific: The way forward for Japan-U.S. and the region (Follow Up)

On Mar 6, 2011, at 4:54 PM, Ignatius Y. Ding wrote:

> Dear Professor Krauss,
>
> In the last few days, I have been following your email exchanges with Dr. Ivy Lee and read all the messages from others to you. I am delighted that the discussions have been civil and educational. As the date of the UCSD public forum on the subject matter rapidly approaches, I would like to add my two cents to the cordial dialogue in the hope that all of our concerns and suggestions would be taken into consideration in your discussion with your university experts and invited guest speakers.
>
> You are correct that numerous Japanese Prime Ministers have offered personal apology to its wartime victims. However, those apologies were invariably followed immediately by one or more flat denial of war responsibility by the same top official or someone in his cabinet, or a landslide vote against the apology by the Diet as in the case of the national apology motioned by the former Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama (村山富市) in 1995, or by dozens (up to 150) cabinet members and Diet members to pay homage at Yasukuni Shrine where not only the 14 Class A war criminals were enshrined as living gods, but also more than 14,000 other war criminals, including 1,068 convicted by the WWII war crimes court, who murdered, brutalized, raped and mutilated tens of millions of innocent civilians in invaded or colonized countries. Their claim to merely honor a national tradition fools no one since there was no such an annual ritual prior to 1978. Note that former Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi’s (小泉純一郎) flip-flop was most startling. He visited the notorious shrine “as the Prime Minster of Japan” within 12 hours after he offered his “heartfelt apology” at an APEC Summit in Singapore. By any measure, his apology is questionable at best. Please keep in mind what Dr. Stanek has pointed out what and how the world, or yourself, might react if top German officials openly worship Adolf Hitler and his Nazi cronies at a national monument.
>
> As a California taxpayer, I am thrilled to learn that our UC faculties include many experts on these important subjects. Our money is well spent to educate our youth of the truth and the facts of historical importance, in a balanced way, as you and your distinguished colleagues strives to achieve.
>
> However, our education should not stop at merely learning from the past, but also the material facts of the present days as well. We learn from the remarkable uprising in the Muslim world, the renewed labor movement across the United States, and the recognition of the forgotten contributions in WWII by the segregated African American soldiers and airmen.
>
> Certainly scholars and experts at UCSD are fully aware the continuing struggles of the survivors of Japanese WWII atrocities and the lingering ill-effect of the weapons of mass destruction Japan left in China that is destroying the eco system along the Russo-Chinese borders. To name a few:
>
> · Survivors of Japanese germ warfare in 22 of China’s 25 provinces continue to suffer from the deadly attacks. Many victims of weaponized Anthrax and Glanders have been crippled and bedridden for more than six decades with infected limbs rotted to the bones.
> · Up to two million shells or canisters of poison gas are scattered in Northeastern China, commonly known as Manchuria. Civilians were killed or severely injured in recent years while leaked poison gas from the rusted bomb shells or canisters gets into underground water and contaminates thousands of square miles of farmland and rural areas.
> · A number of rats captured each year in the mountain regions in Southeast provinces, such as Zhejiang, and Southwest provinces, such as Yunnan, continue to test positive with bubonic plague that was spread by Japan’s germ warfare troops, a.k.a. Unit 731, during the war. So far, the Japanese government refuses to acknowledge and accept responsibility for the war crimes.
>
> The list above could be rather lengthy. Let’s leave that for another day.
>
> Having a democratic system in place is a good thing for the Japanese populace (despite that it was imposed on them by the Allies’ occupation forces). We can’t agree more with you that the current and future generations of Japanese should not be burdened by the sins of their forefathers. Having said that, we still have to question their collective wisdom to elect so many war criminals or their direct descendants into high offices in the post-war governments who have been behind its hard-line ultra-nationalistic policies, including
>
> · the flat denial of responsibilities of the war as the aggressor,
> · the distortion of history in school textbooks and popular multi-media publications,
> · the refusal to pay back wages to its military sexual slaves and enslaved labors,
> · a complete cleanup of its biological and chemical weapons left behind in China and elsewhere; and
> · the rewrite its pacific constitution and the rebuild its military (Japan currently has the largest and most powerful naval force in the Pacific, only second to the US Navy).
>
> Only in the post-war Japan, a country would have elected Class A war criminal like Nobusuke Kishi (aka 岸信介), the slave master and wartime Minister of Commerce and Industry to the Office of Prime Minister multiple times, and placed those who were directly benefitted from the war machine in charge of the nation, such as Junichiro Koizumi (the grandson of the yakuza crime boss, or oya-bun, in Manchuria, the “Tattoo Minister,” and Class C war criminal Matajirō Koizumi, aka 小泉又次郎), Taro Aso, aka 麻生太郎, (the current chairman and president of the Aso Mining family enterprise that was proven enriched by the enslavement of Allied prisoners of war), Shinzo Abe, aka 安倍晋三,(the grandson of Nobusuke Kishi), and the former Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama (鳩山由紀夫) and his brother and LDP top brass Kunio Hatoyama (鳩山邦夫) who are bankrolled into high offices by their mother Yasuko Ishibashi (石橋安子) , the heir of the Ishibashi family enterprise (aka Bridgestone) that enslaved tens of thousands of Koreans and Chinese in Hainan, China and Southeast Asia under its wartime name Nippon Tires. Ishibashi Corporation’s war crimes uniquely included the coercion and trafficking of sexual slaves (aka “Comfort Women”) in war zones. I am certain that the UCSD experts are intimately familiar with these matters of record at the US National Archives and Records Administration in Rockville, MD. This brief and partial list only serves as a reminder to you panelists at the forum.

>
> It is understandable that you would consider Dr. Lee’s suggestion to invite Chinese and Chinese American scholars to future UCSD seminars as “out of line” [intrusion to your academic freedom] – to keep outsiders and especially politics away. However, it is ironic and curious to find your hosting committee of the March 8th event cheerful enlisting the Japanese Consulate General of Los Angeles, an official representative of a foreign government, as your co-sponsor and the flier supplied by its office as the official invitation to the public at large (see below). Does anyone at UCSD get concerned this appearance of collusion to affect your academic integrity and independence? I apologize that I really don’t know how else I might more politely or less directly put this question to you.
>

> —– Forwarded Message —-
> From: “Bibb, Portia” > To: “linhpdu@gmail.com” ; . . . .
> Cc: “Krauss, Ellis” ; Kanako Kozasa ; “Hoshi, Takeo” > Sent: Tue, March 1, 2011 5:00:13 PM
> Subject: China and the Asia-Pacific: The way forward for Japan-U.S. and the region
>
> Dear China Focused Community Friends,
>
> On behalf of Dean Peter Cowhey at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (http://irps.ucsd.edu/), at UC San Diego, we are excited to share a special event starting at 2:30 pm on Tuesday, March 8th, entitled $B!H(BChina and the Asia-Pacific: The way forward for Japan-U.S. and the region.$B!I(B This will be held on the campus at UCSD-please find driving and parking directions below to IR/PS.
>
> http://irps.ucsd.edu/experience/our-campus/driving-directions.htm
>
> Event Overview: What are the opportunities and challenges presented by the rise of China, and what should be Japan-U.S. response for the region? Japanese and American experts will discuss the diplomatic, security, economic, energy policy implications for Japan, the U.S., and other players in the region. Please see the distinguished panelists, in the attached flyer cosponsored by the Japan Consulate in Los Angeles.
>
> March 8, 2011
> 2:30 pm China and the Asia-Pacific: The way forward for Japan-U.S. and the region panel presentation
> 4:00 pm Reception
> School of International Relations and Pacific Studies
>
> We hope that you may have time to send a special invitation to your community friends. We hope to see many of you next Tuesday if possible. Please let us know your questions.
>
> Thank you sincerely,
> Portia and team
>
> —— Forwarded Message
> From: Kanako Kozasa
> Date: Tue, 1 Mar 2011 13:04:17 -0800
> To: “Bibb, Portia” > Cc: “Keckin, Amanda”
> Subject: RE: IR/PS March 8 Event
>
> Dear Portia
>
> Good afternoon. I hope you had a wonderful weekend.
>
> Please find the attached flier.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
> Kanako Kozasa
> $B>.:{AU;R(B
> Advisor
> Consulate General of Japan, Los Angeles
> Tel: (213) 617-6700 ext. 309
> Fax: (213) 617-6728

> ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
>
> There is absolutely no intention on my part to offend you or anyone at UCSD. It is only meant to engage in a frank and honest dialogue in the hope to start productive exchange in the future. Again, I sincerely offer again our unqualified support to UCSD in developing educational materials and conduct balanced review of history and regional strategic relations. Please call on us if we can help identifying guest speakers for your seminars or candidates for your research programs. Thanks you.
>
> Ignatius Y. Ding
>
> Executive Vice President
>
> Global Alliance for Preserving the Truth of WWII in Asia
>
> www.global-alliance.net
>

—– Forwarded Message —-
From: Ellis Krauss
To: Ignatius Y. Ding
Sent: Sun, March 6, 2011 7:48:41 PM
Subject: Re: China and the Asia-Pacific: The way forward for Japan-U.S. and the region (Follow Up)

Dear Ignatius, Thank you for your opinions. I am quite busy this week and have already responded as to my opinions on these issues multiple times so won’t bore you with further extensive ones. Here, however are some brief responses of the points in your message:

1)I am quite aware of what the Japanese army did during the Pacific War and the historical memories issue is discussed (objectively) in my classes where students of all nationalities have the opportunity to express their views.
2) I agree with you that good percentage of Japan’s problem is that the sincere apologies of government leaders is undercut by the actions and statements of others and right-wing groups. I abhor that too. But Japan is a democracy where you cannot force people to believe what they don’t want to believe. May I ask if the Tibet issue and what China has and is doing there been an issue widely discussed by the Chinese government publicly? By commentators freely in China? Should that topic be on every list of every event held on China and experts on it be invited? I think you see my point. As abhorrent as the actions of those politicians and individuals are, if the question is whether Japan has apologized or not, the answer is yes there have been many.

I applaud your and others’ efforts to spread the truth about those years to Japanese and Americans. But other than a more formal apology, what would you have the Japanese government do? Would such a formal apology satisfy you?

3)Yes, that is correct: the CG of LA is sponsoring the event. The answer is that I feel no problem with that because I was involved in the issue of whom to invite. The event is actually a follow-up event to one held at Columbia U. in NYC sponsored by the CG there. We were asked if we would like to host a follow-up event at which two of the scholars at that meeting would report on the discussions there to a West coast audience. I agreed and we tried to get several faculty at my School to attend. As it turned out I and Barry Naughton were the only ones who could make it. As the two scholars coming to this event who were at the NY meeting are both highly respected and legitimate experts on China and Japan-China whom me and my colleague knows, I did not see a single thing wrong with that. We cosponsor events with local groups and community people and governments and groups all the time. As long as it is a legitimate academic event, at which we have input and final say over the individuals invited I don’t see a problem. I myself don’t even know what the report is going to say and may well talk about the historical memories issue. But I’m sure it will all be done in an objective and responsible manner.
Best regards,
Ellis

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